Hidden Science – behind the scenes

Hidden Science – behind the scenes

I am going to share something I have never written about before but get asked about a lot – what it was really like to be a part of the Hidden Science show.

A request

Around July 2013 I got a message from internationally renowned David Icke asking me to create a TV show for his new venture The People’s Voice TV (TPV). He wanted to create a credible show which would debate various scientific issues and be able to invite skeptics into the studio.

James and I quickly put together a proposal and a video highlighting the sorts of areas I had been involved with so far. David had come to me asking me to create a Punk Science show so a natural progression was to align it with the types of topics covered in the book. For the first time ever, we are making this audition footage available to the public. As you can see this was when the show was still called ‘Punk Science’

 

The planning stages

As time progressed, I thought it best to separate the show from my persona and brand, Punk Science so it was not all about me. The first producer involved came up with the name ‘Hidden Science’ and the graphics person, Miki Zoric got to work immediately on the amazing graphics that you see on the show.

Hidden Science the People's voice

To attend meetings, I had to travel down from Derbyshire, where I lived at the time, all the way to Wembley in North London where David’s team had kitted out a large office and TV studio. Through the hard work of some dedicated individuals who were either volunteers or receiving very little money, the sets and the office for TPV slowly took shape. Equipment was donated or obtained second hand and the office and studio gradually started to take shape.

The Hidden Science team

There was an initial shuffling around of the staff which ended up with bringing the director John Webster of Patient Zero Productions on board with the musician and producer, Clifford White. Both worked without pay or expenses for the entire time of the project. John Webster and myself eventually emerged as the main production thrust of the project and despite the fact that neither of us were getting paid, we both insisted on high standards in our complementary skills which contributed to the show’s success.

Yes you read that right, despite the fact that Hidden Science pretty much became my full time work for eight months, I did not receive a penny in payment for work or for expenses even though I was traveling from London to Derbyshire to take shoot the show, which was a round trip of 300 miles. Luckily I had some other work that came in during that period but it was a bit touch and go for myself and James. In an attempt to limit the amount of travel I had to do, I insisted that we prerecord two shows in a day so that I could fit shows around my speaking schedule.

Co-ordinating our skills

Between us we created a list of topics, guests and went about booking them. It was all hands on deck each of us using our skills to put the project together. Clifford composed the music to Miki Zoric’s opening title graphics. He also co-ordinated the guests with me and liaised between TPV and Hidden Science.

John created the set design and even came up with the printed background idea that enable TPV to quickly change studios in between shows. He created the running order and format and directed the show with the gallery director. This included a new experience for me – having someone talking in my ear whilst I was on the show. It reminded me a bit of seeing patients as a doctor as I needed to be conscious of several lines of thinking at once.

John would also film the mini documentaries that you see in the show with the actress, Grace Willis. He would also put all the footage together including the graphics and sometimes take the footage into Wembley to be uploaded in person.

We also had a great team from TPV which would include people helping with the set, audio technicians, gallery directors and more. Liz Roberts was the main point of contact for all the shows and she did an amazing job at coordinating everything for the entire channel.

Hidden Science Behind The Scenes

Some of the TPV crew getting ready for the show
             Image:James Gordon Graham

With my experience in the field of science and spirituality I was able to book a lot of the guests as I have a lot of contacts in this area. Coordinating things so that three people ended up on the sofa in Wembley on the correct day to talk about the right topic took many hours and I did this from home. After the first show, I also wrote the scripts and the running order as well as sorting out the teleprompter and even doing the makeup for the guests and myself!

It was hard work to research the topics of each show which often involved reading the books which had been written by the guests. I felt it was almost like sitting exams again as I needed to be prepared for each show. I also wrote all the questions for the guests and their introductory biographies.

The success of the show

We knew that we had high standards but we did not expect what happened next. For a lot of the time that TPV was running, Hidden Science became one of the most viewed shows on the channel based on the Youtube views. The shows were added to Youtube after airing on the internet channel. Some of the statistics have been lost as the Youtube channel was hacked and all of the videos deleted but even with the replaced videos you can still see the popularity of the shows.

You won’t see the success of Hidden Science reflected in any of the trailers for TPV which are still on the internet because for some reason, despite me twice making the unpaid 300 mile round trip to the studio for promotion events when asked, we were not interviewed for them or the footage was not used. I still don’t know why this was the case because communication with management remained poor and chaotic throughout the experience. In fact I wasn’t ever sure whom to address issues to apart from Liz Roberts. There were no contracts or known management structure to refer to.

Interestingly the skeptics did not agree to come on the show. So we didn’t have the debates that David originally wanted. Instead a lot of the content was about exploring new scientific vistas with me playing devil’s advocate if needed. The shows opened up new possibilities instead of just pointing out what was wrong with the world right now – it was a message of hope and new growth. To our surprise this approach was very popular.

Would I do it again?

Ultimately, although I am glad I did the show as I was able to bring in the benefit of my experience and contacts to the show to elevate it to something of a serious scientific discourse. However, I don’t think hosting a TV show is really my forte although I enjoyed the production side of it. I am glad that I was part of bringing something of interest to a lot of people from the numbers of appreciative messages the team received.

Because the filming of the shows were often so hectic, we did not have much time to take footage of behind the scenes but sometimes James would help with the shows and this is some of the footage that was taken of the studio and in the gallery.

 

If you would like to find out more about the shows and watch the episodes, click here.

Images and videos: James Gordon Graham

Logo: Miki Zoric

Before the cameras were rolling on Punk Science

Before the cameras were rolling on Punk Science

One of the most popular interviews I have ever done for Punk Science was in 2008 with Iain McNay of Conscious TV.
It has been shown many times on television channels such as Edge Media TV on Sky amongst others.

What you might not know is that Iain McNay is involved in the music industry and has had a lot of dealings with punk music. So before the cameras started rolling, we had a great chat about music and discovered a shared love of Courtney’s Love’s work – which is grossly underestimated in both our opinions.

Later Ian McNay actually named Punk Science as one of his favourite books of all time which is a great honour especially considering how many authors he interviews!

The interview itself features insights on how the Black Hole Principle came to be as well as musings on the nature of consciousness and quantum physics. You can see the interview here.

Enjoy!

To find out more about Punk Science click here.

Is this a lost temple to the giants?

Is this a lost temple to the giants?

Image: By Odilia (Own work) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html), CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/) or FAL], via Wikimedia Commons

We live in a society influenced by the Bible and in most people’s minds the classic biblical monarchs such as David and Solomon evoke a golden age of Israel: of wisdom, wealth and sophistication.

So it comes as a shock to most people to find out that despite over half a century of archaeological searching, we still cannot find any evidence of a monarchy at the time of King David. No palaces, no temples, no infrastructure, no masses of court records and as one archaeologist said, we cannot even find the garbage! It just did not exist at that time in that place.

Of course people do argue that because the Temple mound, where the Dome of the Rock is currently situated, cannot be excavated, we are unable to confirm if the original Temple of Solomon which used to be the centre of the Jewish faith, actually existed there.

But even so, we would expect to find the artefacts of a great kingdom that existed in the area; an organised society like that simply leaves its mark, but we have found nothing.

This has led some leading experts to rewrite the Biblical stories understanding them to be greatly exaggerated. According to the archaeological evidence, the area around Jerusalem were just sparsely populated highlands at the supposed time of King David.

Le courronnement de David.Paris psalter (BnF MS Grec 139), folio 6v
National Library of France. Public Domain

So according to some scholars, the great monarch becomes a tribal chieftain with a band of tribal warriors instead of armies. This may be far from the sumptuous riches that the bible describes, but it fits the picture that we see in the actual evidence.

I find this idea quite strange. Not because I am religious (I am not) or because I have a need to glorify these kings – these were not the heroes of my childhood. I find it odd that King David – such a flawed character would be pure fiction. He is murderous, conniving and backstabbing to the point where even his own sons rise up against him.

Far from being the happy succession from father to son we tend to assume happened, Solomon was not King David’s eldest son but the son of the woman he spied from the rooftops who was married to someone else. David had the husband out of the way and got his wife Bathsheba pregnant. (So much for ‘you shall not commit adultery or murder’!)

I just don’t think it is human nature to provide a character to your glorious made-up ancestral King and make him into such a nasty piece of work. The fact that there are two versions of the story of King David in the bible and one has been sanitised shows that someone was indeed embarrassed at his antics at some point.

It started me wondering if the stories have not been transplanted from another place and time and brought to Jerusalem in the memories of another people. Could it be that we have been looking for evidence in the wrong place.

I find it very intriguing that although nothing like the Temple of Solomon or his kingdom can be found in Jerusalem and the ancient Kingdom of Judah, further north there exists a temple that fits the description of the Temple of Solomon very closely. This is the Ain Dara Temple in Syria and it has some very interesting features.

Its measurements, the way in which it is decorated and its layout greatly resembles the Temple of Solomon in the Bible. There are other Temples in the area which are of a similar style. And in contrast to Judah in the south at this time, the writing of a great civilisation has been found: for example over 20,000 clay tablets at the site of Ebla or Tell Mardikh also near Aleppo in Syria. Here we do find temples, palaces and a lot of writing.

By Odilia (Own work) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html), CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/) or FAL], via Wikimedia Commons

Could it be that the stories we see in the Bible are actually memories of people who migrated from north to south? They just transplanted their memories of the glory days to their new habitat.

The Old Testament only started to be written down after the time of the Babylonian exile in 700s BC. The people we now call ‘Jews’ had just been through a massive humiliation. They needed to rally round and write down their history in order to unite under a common story. This was possibly when stories which were originally about what we now call Syria were simply incorporated into the narrative of the people who lived in Judah.

Was it possible that the ones who had migrated from the north brought their stories with them and transplanted them? If so it gives a very interesting slant on what else can be found at Ain Dara.

Because almost as if a god or goddess had entered the temple, the footprints actually exist of what appears to be a giant being. Now the Old Testament does indeed mention giants on some occasions. We are also rediscovering many reports from around the world in the last 200 years especially of giant skeletons having been found.

Could Ain Dara be evidence that the Bible and other giant myths are true? Could the temple be a site where an actual giant god mentioned in the bible was present? I am going to be discussing more about these ideas in the forthcoming book and mystery school so stay tuned.

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